Africa: Google U.S.$3.9 Million Fund for Tech Startups to Export Technologies

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A US$3.980 million (Sh479.2 million) fund will help 60 black-founded African firms so they may export their technologies outside their nations, including 12 in Kenya.

The businesses will also gain from a six-month training programme that will introduce them to a network of mentors who can assist them in resolving unique problems.

  • A US$ 3.980 million (Sh479.2 million) fund will help 60 black-founded firms in Africa so they may export their technologies outside of their nations
  • Nigeria has the most grantees with 23, followed by Kenya with 12, Rwanda with 6, South Africa with 5, and Uganda with 4
  • The businesses will also gain from a six-month training programme that will introduce them to a network of mentors who can assist them in resolving unique problems

They will participate in specialised workshops, peer support groups, and community-building activities throughout the training, in addition to receiving non-dilutive accolades of between Sh6 million and Sh12 million and up to Sh24 million in Google Cloud Credit.

The grant recipients in this year’s cohort, 50% of whom are women-owned enterprises, are from Kenya, Botswana, Ethiopia, Cameroon, Ghana, Rwanda, Nigeria, and South Africa. Senegal, and Uganda.

They specialise in sectors such as fintech, healthcare, e-commerce, logistics, agtech, education, hospitality and smart cities.

Although there are many opportunities in the vast continent of Africa, there is a lack of variety in the flow of venture capital funding.

“We expect that Black Founders Fund Program would be capable of bridging the gap of disproportionate funding between ex-pat businesses over local and black-led enterprises”, Folarin Aiyegbusi, Head of Startup Ecosystem Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), stated.

Of the ten nations, Nigeria has the most grantees with 23, followed by Kenya with 12, Rwanda with 6, South Africa with 5, and Uganda with 4.

Ethiopia has two chosen startups; Cameroon and Ghana each have three grants, and Botswana and Senegal each have one selected startup.

The 60 grantees of the Google for Startups Black Founders Fund Initiative will be introduced to Google’s products, relationships, and best practices in order to assist them in improving the products and services they already offer, and so make a positive impact on the African economy.

This is consistent with the IT giant’s dedication to supporting startups and entrepreneurs in the area as a necessary precondition for promoting jobs and progress on the continent.

The Google for Startups Black Founders Fund will be funded by Google’s implementation partner CcHUB.Solutech, Ajua, online booking site BuuPass, FlexPay, DohYangu, Leja, Keep IT Cool, Synnefa, TopUp Mama, TIBU Health, Zuri Health, and, Zanifu are among the Kenyan firms that have been chosen.

Applicants who are in the early stages of a startup with black founders or diverse founding teams and a headquarters in Africa are eligible for funding.

Solutech, one of the BFF startups, provides Fast-Moving Products firms with real-time data from field sales teams, leveraging powerful insights to assist companies in their day-to-day and strategic decision-making.

Solutech Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder Alexander Odhiambo, said the business now operates in more than five countries with more than 70 enterprises.

“BFF will assist us in growing and developing the technology so that we may expand into other areas. It also will help us access the Google Skill base to build the enterprise,” Odhiambo explained.